Vaginal Birth After C-Section (VBAC)

VBAC is an acronym that stands for vaginal birth after csection (also known as vaginal birth after cesarean). A woman may choose to have a baby delivered vaginally after a previous delivery by C-section. Benefits of a vaginal birth after cesarean. Some benefits of vaginal birth after csection include fewer complications and shorter recovery time than with a repeat C-section. If a vaginal birth after csection is an option for you, it allows you to hold and breastfeed your baby sooner than with a repeat C-section. The success rate for vaginal birth after csection, or VBAC is 75%, while 25% end up repeating a C-section. Call Dr. Hill, your Obstetrician / OBGYN doctor to see if you are a good candidate for a vaginal birth after cesarean.

Some things to consider about a Vaginal Birth After Cesarean vs. Repeat Cesarean:

  • If you've had a vertical incision in the upper part of your uterus (classical incision), vaginal birth after csection is not recommended due to the risk of uterine rupture.
  • A home delivery isn't appropriate for vaginal birth after csection (VBAC). Plan to deliver at a facility equipped to handle an emergency C-section.
  • In certain situations where vaginal birth after csection is desired, C-section might be recommended if you have placenta problems, a breech presentation or an infection that could be passed to your baby during vaginal delivery—such as genital herpes.

There are several more eligibility factors to ponder if you are considering vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). Therefore, if you are considering vaginal birth after csection (VBAC), discuss it with OB/GYN Dr. Hill or Nurse Practitioner Cynthia Daniels early in the pregnancy to make sure you cover all the factors.

Also, find out about the vaginal birth after cesarean policy at the facility where you plan to deliver your baby, but try to stay flexible. The circumstances of your labor could make vaginal birth after csection (VBAC)  a clear choice—or, after your OB/GYN appointment, you and your women’s health care provider might decide that a repeat C-section would be best after all.

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